MUSC 297 Music of Central Asia: From Throat-Singing to Heavy Metal

The music of the Hu was chosen as the soundtrack to Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order because it sounded otherworldly to Western audiences. In fact, the Hu draw on ancient musical traditions from Central Asia, one of the most culturally and musically diverse areas of the world. This course introduces students to a wide range of music practices, genres, and styles in historically nomadic and sedentary regions of Central Asia: throat-singing, sounds of shamanic and Sufi Islamic rituals, epic performance, narrative instrumental playing, oral poetry competitions, folk and art singing, Western-influenced classical and popular music genres (Central Asian repertoires of opera and symphony, Azerbaijani jazz, Uzbek estrada, Kazakh Q-pop and crossover music, Mongolian heavy metal and hip-hop). The roles and meanings of music and the status of musicians are discussed in relation to wider aspects of cultural and social life, the impact of Soviet culture policies, post-Soviet national revival and globalization. The course draws on extensive audiovisual materials and is open to students of all levels. No background in music or Central Asia is required.

The course audio/video resources are available here: https://www.musicofcentralasia.org/Tracks

Course Withdrawal Deadline 12/2

The deadline to withdraw from full-semester and second-quarter classes for the Fall 2022 semester is Friday, December 2, at 5:00 p.m EST.

If you need to withdraw from a course, please send a group email to the instructor, your faculty advisor, and your class dean, and attach a withdrawal form.

If you are thinking about withdrawing from a course:

  • Do use this time to talk to your professors, your advisors, and your class dean about your concerns.
  • Do make sure you are taking advantage of all the resources available to you.
  • Do not wait until Friday at 4:00 p.m. to seek advice from your instructor, advisor, or dean because you probably won’t hear back from them until after the deadline has passed.

Winter Session Aid App Opens Wed 10/12

The application for Winter Session financial aid opens on Wed 10/12 on WesPortal (Classes > Winter Session). This application will close on Friday 11/4 at noon. Please apply for aid if you think you might be interested in Winter Session. Applying for aid does not obligate you to take Winter Session. Please note that full need is not met for Winter Session.

Courses will be a mix of on-campus and online and will be posted before registration opens on Tues, Nov 15. If you have questions, please contact department staff here.

Enroll Me and Drop Add (8/29 – 9/16)

Drop/Add begins Monday, August 29 and closes on Friday, September 16. 

Please review the Drop/Add process information available on the Registrar’s website. You must first click the “Enroll Me” button in WesPortal before you can participate in Drop/Add.

Our Senior Associate Registrar, Karri Van Blarcom, has created a helpful video guide about the Drop/Add process. Check it out to prepare for Drop/Add.

 

Summer Session II Classes Begin 6/27

Summer Session II begins Monday, June 27. It is still possible to register if you submit your registration form, advisor approval and payment by noon on Wed 6/15.

Here is the link to the summer registration form – or you can use the personalized version in your Portal.

The following courses have seats available as of 6/13 at 4pm.

·       MUSC103Z Materials and Design | Instructor: Michael Weinstein-Reiman | Schedule: Tuesday through Friday, 8:30-10:35am

·       WRCT228Z/ENGL259Z The Art of the Personal Essay |  Instructor: Lauren Silber |  Schedule: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday, 1:10-3:15pm

·       IDEA185Z/CIS185Z Digital Media and Design I | Instructor: Chris Chenier | Schedule: Monday through Friday, 9:00-10:40am

·       WRCT201Z/EDST201Z/CGST201Z Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) | Instructor: Elizabeth Hepford | Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 3:30-5:35pm

For more information visit the Summer Session Courses page.

In-Person Classes Resume; Semester Start Resources

It has been great seeing so many of you on campus. I hope you have enjoyed your first few class sessions. Sharing with you some information that may be useful as you navigate the beginning of the semester:

  • WSA Text Exchange: The Wesleyan Student Assembly (WSA) has partnered with other colleges to help students purchase textbooks at a discounted rate. For more information, check out the website here.
  • Drop/Add Deadline is Wed 2/9. There are many resources to assist you with drop/add including but not limited to:
    • Your pre-major advisor
    • Academic Peer Advisors (APAs) – in fact our APAs are hosting appointments to assist with drop/add this next week and a half. Email or click on the QR code in the flyer here.  
    • Registrar’s Office website (features FAQs)
  • CSS Info Session 2/1: For more information, visit my blog post here.
  • Enrollment Holds: If you have not already, please be sure to officially enroll for the semester. To do this, visit WesPortal. Click on the “Enroll in the University & Clear Action Items” alert box. Scroll to the bottom of the page and click on the red “Enroll Me” button. You may find other holds here as well – be sure to clear those holds by following the directions listed in the description of the hold.

If you have questions, please don’t hesitate to reach out! Schedule an appt with me here or stop by my office in North College 202 for my daily office hours listed below:

  • Monday 2:00 – 3:00 pm
  • Tuesday 3:00 – 4:00 pm
  • Wednesday 4:00 – 5:00 pm
  • Thursday 10:00 – 11:00 am
  • Friday 9:00 – 10:00 am

Take care,

Dean Dunn

HIST 304: Middle East Intellectuals and Modernity
Toksoz,Meltem
Thursdays, 01:20PM-04:10PM
Allbritton 004

How have Middle Eastern intellectuals conceived and discussed modernity? We will use this question to analyze the variety in the history of thought in Middle Eastern societies in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Modernization, formation of the modern state and issues of nationalism, imperialism and colonialism, main intellectual questions of the time, will form the framework as we analyze their political, social, and cultural impact on the production of knowledge in the Ottoman and post-Ottoman lands. As such it is NOT a history of the Middle East but rather a history of mentalities, organized around four thematic/chronological modules (Reform, Modern State and Constitutionalism/Panislamism, Nationalisms and Colonialisms) each representing a set of concepts, ideas, and movements as well as facts and problems, all of which will be compared to the larger world of modern state formation both in thought and practice. The principal aim is to familiarize students with the processes of modernization in the making of the modern Middle East.