Student Employment at Wes

Are you looking for an on-campus job? Interested in learning more about how to navigate Handshake and find the perfect fit? Join Gordon Career Center staff members on Wednesday, February 9th at 12:00pm to hear about the basics of searching for and landing an on-campus job. Learn about the current job postings, resources, and how to navigate the search process. Sign onto Handshake on WesPortal to learn more.

Sustainability Office is Hiring

To all those interested in improving sustainability at Wesleyan, the Sustainability Office is hiring for 2 positions: 1 Sustainability Coordinator and 1 Waste Not Coordinator! We welcome ALL students (2023, 2024, and 2025) who are passionate about campus engagement to apply. 

  • Sustainability Coordinators (SCs) design and run independent projects that promote holistic sustainability and run Waste Not (the annual student-run tag sale) 
  • The Waste Not Coordinator plans and runs Waste Not with the SCs

Applicants should be self-directed, organized, and strong communicators. The position will require about 5 hours per week, paid at $13/hour ($14/hour starting in August 2022), with a requirement to work through Senior Week and return early during Orientation week, as well as occasional remote meetings in the summer. This position will be filled by students regardless of their work-study eligibility, with preference given to work-study eligible students. 

Find the full job description at https://www.wesleyan.edu/sustainability/involved/office/internships.html

To apply: Fill out our application form at https://bit.ly/sc-wnapp AND apply via Handshake (https://wesleyan.joinhandshake.com/emp/jobs/5962547) by Monday, February 21st at 11:59 PM.  Please don’t hesitate to reach out to the current Coordinators with any questions at wesustainability@gmail.com.

Summer Opportunities Panel – Wesleyan Women in Science

Join us this Friday December 3rd at 12:15pm for our Summer Opportunities Panel in the Gordon Career Center. Don’t miss out on the chance to hear your peers in STEM talk about their experiences doing a wide range of interesting things over the summer and learn how you can get involved!

Join us next Tuesday December 7th at 12pm for the next lunch in our student-faculty lunch series for a conversation with Psychology Professor Grace Sullivan

Choosing Majors and Careers for F-1 Visa Holders

Thursday, November 4, 4:30-5:30 p.m. EDT

Zoom link: https://wesleyan.zoom.us/j/4831393485

Intended Audience: Classes of 2024 and 2025 F-1 visa holders

Session Description: In this virtual session, you will learn about important factors (personal interests, career prospects, immigration-related benefits/regulations) to consider when choosing a major as an F-1 visa holder. Class Deans from the Office of Academic Advancement and staff members from the Office of International Student Affairs (OISA) and Gordon Career Center will lead this informational workshop, which will include an overview of the major selection process, post-completion employment as an F-1 visa holder, and STEM Optional Practical Training (OPT) Extension-eligible programs of study at Wesleyan. There will be time for Questions and Answers (Q&A) in the second half of the session.  

Please RSVP through this link.

Resources to Consider

Good morning, Class of 2025!

I hope this communication finds you well. Some items that may be of interest to you:

  1. Employment. Interested in obtaining a part-time job? Be sure to utilize Handshake or visit the Gordon Career Center to learn about employment opportunities.
  1. SHAPE: The Office of Support, Healing, Activism, and Prevention Education (SHAPE) has created a series of events in October to raise awareness about dating violence in our community and beyond. See their blog to learn more.
  1. Department Open Houses: Though you will not declare your major until second semester of your sophomore year, some of you may already have an idea of what you want to study. Visiting a department open house can provide a lot of insight into various majors. See the schedule for department open houses that run in October and November here.

I’ve enjoyed meeting with many of you over the past couple of weeks. Don’t forget to check out your class photo. As a reminder, those who visit my office and show me where they are in the photo will get a small takeaway for stopping by. Get that Wes swag!

Dean Dunn

Additional Information about English Coursework and Medical School Requirements

Any course that fits the classification shown below (taken from the AMCAS Guide) and entails writing at least 3 or more short papers or critiques will be considered an ENGL course for medical schools and other health professions programs. As I mentioned during the overview, you will find these courses under other course prefixes as well. For example, the First Year Seminar—August Wilson (ENGL 176), which is cross-listed with Theater and African American Studies, includes assignments such as “Short Papers, Writing Assignments, and a Final Research Essay.” Another example is the “Introduction to the Hebrew Bible” which is listed as a Religious Studies (201) and as a Medieval Studies Course, requires weekly written responses and three papers and is described as:

“the Hebrew Bible within its historical context while considering its literary, philosophical, and artistic legacy. Students will be exposed to the main historical strands of biblical criticism, while also engaging with the challenges of interpreting the Bible as modern readers: How and when did the Hebrew Bible come to be, and what relevance might it hold for us today? By beginning at the beginning and proceeding systematically through the Hebrew Bible, students will hone their skills as readers and interpreters of the Bible as a canon. Students will consider questions of the texts’ function, universality, and authority, and will be encouraged to explore the wide range of biblical interpretations in literature, music, and the fine arts from antiquity to the present day.”

Another example is ENGL 216: Techniques of Poetry, which is a creative writing course and requires writing throughout the semester. Just find something that you will enjoy and that fulfills the AMCAS ENGL classification.

Image of English Language and Literature (ENGL) Categories: Composition and Rhetoric, Creative Writing, and Literature

Questions? Please contact Dr. Mildred Rodríguez (mrodriguez01@wesleyan.edu) for pre-health professions advising.

Missed the Health Professions Coursework Overview Session? You May Access the Recording and Preliminary Transcript Below!


Link to Recording and Preliminary Transcript for Health Professions Coursework Overview – July 27, 2021
https://wesleyan.zoom.us/rec/share/O_5meoefIrHqn0mQYUhAdamxW8goITi31UWmdT6Sv7IUfg208qkb-ag5nBHGLkUT.3fRxP6nnNdvqqMPX 

Passcode: sRD4+saR

Questions? Please contact Dr. Mildred Rodríguez (mrodriguez01@wesleyan.edu) for pre-health professions advising.

Additional Information about AP Credits and Medical School

This is information for students interested in medical school who have AP credits.

When completing the centralized application for MD programs i.e. the AMCAS, these are the instructions for AP credits and other advanced level courses from high school:

Advanced Placement (AP) 

To claim AP credit, the credit hours must be listed on your transcript. AP courses should be entered under the term the college credit was initially granted for. If no term is designated, include the credits with freshman coursework (FR). Include AP credit courses only once (by selecting Advanced Placement as the Special Course Type), even though AP credit for the same subject may have been awarded by more than one institution. AP courses may be assigned under the institution awarding the most credit. If AP credits appear in one block on the transcript, distribute the credit appropriately among the AP exams taken. 

AMCAS has special designations for some courses. If applicable, assign one or more special course types by checking the corresponding box. 

If you choose to omit your AP courses, AMCAS staff will add the credits to your application as a lump credit (even though the courses may be listed individually on the transcripts on file). 

For example, the University of Southern California awarded nine credits for three AP exams. On the official transcript, the credit appears as nine credits for AP exams, with no indication of the subject of the individual exams. On your AMCAS application, enter each exam as an individual course and distribute the credits appropriately, but do not exceed the total amount of credits earned. 

If the transcript from the college awarding AP credit does not list course names, enter the subject area for which credit was earned (e.g., AP Credit: English) as the Course Name. 

If the following course types appear on your official transcript, they should be indicated as AP on the AMCAS application even if they are not technically Advanced Placement. 

Image of listing of course types that may appear on a transcript.

Questions? Please contact Dr. Mildred Rodríguez (mrodriguez01@wesleyan.edu) for pre-health professions advising.